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which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say -- how do we change and improve? the national leadership of the building trade has gone across 350 c
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
the effort was an attack on law-abiding americans. >> i'm amazed at -- as was true in the civil rights struggle in the '60s, how much deception, how much deliberate misstatement of reality is taking place in this debate. >> president clinton campaigned tirelessly for the crime bill and often surrounded by police officers who argued they were being outgunned by criminals. the white house added funds to build prisons and put more cops on the streets and ordered to draw more republican votes. even so it was political tightrope. and democrats knew it. though the ban barely survived contentious vote in the house. ultimately passing by just a two-vote martin. 216-the 214. one of the narrowist legislative victories in history. once attached to the larger crime bill the whole thing went back to congress in the fall of '1994. in his book "my life," former president clinton remembered a direct appeal from democrats. just before the house vote on the crime bill, speaker tom foley and majority leader dick gephardt made a last-ditch appeal to remove the assault weapons ban from the bill. they said
of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [applause] [chanting] secondly, this vision, you could call it ini
. during the civil rights movement he was kind of a hero of mine. much more so than martin luther king, because i was quite of a radical as a young person, and i was the one that thought we should shall overcome is not a effective way of gaining civil rights. i think i i thought that more confrontation was needed. >> host: what made you a radical? what does it mean? >> guest: i think a radical, -- i'm still a radical today. that is i believe that a radical is any person who believes in the official liberty and individual freedom and limited government. that makes you a radical. and i have always been a -- person who believe that people should not we are interfere with me. i should be able to do my own thing as long as i don't violate the rights other people. >> host: who is the difference of following malcom x. omar tin luther king? >> host: well, at that time i thought martin luther king was too much a compriseer. i was willing to demand people in my career in the army was a part of that vision of confronting racial discrimination. >> host: how tall are you? >> guest: six foot fight.
. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth build, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say, how do we change? how do we improve? the national leadership o
forfeit its rights. however, we cannot give amnesty on behalf of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [ap
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. for a professional cleansing device? join the counter revolution and switch to olay pro-x. get cleansing results as effective as a $200 system. guaranteed or your money back. olay pro-x. >>> good day to all of you. welcome to "weekends with alex witt," it's 1:00 p.m. on the east coast, 10:00 a.m. out west. new today,
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
active as civil rights laws. so it influences private law. so there could be a market for privacy. so they come along and say we will make it easier for you. and then facebook had to modify things and so forth. so what i am suggesting is a type of touchstone. before i buy an iphone, i give consideration to all the security. anywhere you go on the web, when it's not protected -- if you think about things like that the people might hold as private. >> you do a lot of coverage around the intersection of technology. does this seem like a real step forward to you? can you talk about your reaction? >> well, i think it speaks to the problems at this point. a lot of judges interpret the law around these technologies and don't always understand the technology. many have found that there are expressions are under around her e-mail and law enforcement can only get that technological issue straightened out. many would say that it is upsetting. in terms of trying to apply everything -- i mean, the constitution is supposed to have businesses not be able to look at a facebook page when they are maki
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
. in a statement, he said the protesters have the constitutional right to demonstrate. he also called on his partners to help preserve civil peace. but he shifted the blame on to parliament, and called on it to do with protesters' demands. but the mass rally seemed to have expanded. friday marked one of the biggest days of demonstrations that have taken part in the last two weeks in at least 15,000 cities across the country. they are calling for equality and the end to the targeting of zunis. when nothing less. -- sunnis, nothing less. >> a prominent shiite cleric reached out, to a mosque in baghdad. he also went to the catholic church attack in 2010 by sunni fighters. >> we have learned a big lesson from this church and our brother christians in iraq. want to return to peace than confront the terrorists who want to split religions in iraq. >> the leaders of sudan and south sudan are meeting in addis about a -- abbaba to negotiate border disputes. pseudonym and south sudan came close to war last year over the disputes. both accused each other of supporting rebels in each other's territories.
, and food and clean water. human rights groups are holding solidarity civiles across -- vigils across the world. activists say the red cross received hundreds of millions of dollars in donations but they say very little has gone to help earthquake survey survivors. >>> seismologists giving a second thought to a theory on how a major earthquake on the san andorra warehouse fault mate effect thousands of people in california. the two sections of the fault are considered locked but the central section of the fault creeps and thought to provide a buffer between the two zones. but the magnitude 9 earthquake in japan two years ago proved that theory is not always true. >>> a public memorial is planned tomorrow for the petaluma teenager who died after a new years eve party in south like tahoe. her body was found behind a snow bank just a week ago. she attended a music festival and may well have vied to walk three miles back to her hotel. tomorrow's memorial is at the public school. >>> karl bell soup company in south sacramento will be laying off 290 workers on february 1st. all 750 employe
which does civil charges, that is where they have their most vulnerability. something along the lines of what goldman sachs paid on the civil case with the trade. and then you move on. this is an interesting time right now. i will say this, if the sec gets him, he is still not out of the woods. if they hit him, that is the highest level of civil fraud. goldman sachs, which you may not know, they settled with the sec, they didn't settle, they settled for something called negligence, it is very hard to be a registered rocher deal and be hit with that penalty. there's a good chance he could be shut down anyway. if you get hit. this is high-stakes stuff. they're taking it very seriously, talking to investors. i talked to an investor today and he runs with investors and directing certain funds. he's a big proponent and put a hold on the stock saying don't go there. before you're given a more money, see what investigations go because obviously they are liabilities and fund could face and if your money is locked in, you lose money. we should also point out to have a lot of unusual insurance
are now right on the border of this civil war. >> nick paton walsh for us in istanbul. career counselors saying getting ahead in your current job could be as easy as raising your hand. we can tell you what else you need to know to get a raise or move up the career ladder. advice coming next. i can't imagine anything better. you're getting a ton of shrimp, and it tastes really good! [ male announcer ] hurry in to red lobster's 30 shrimp for just $11.99! choose any two of five savory shrimp selections, like mango jalapeƑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. two delicious shrimp selections on one plate! all with salad and unlimited cheddar bay biscuits. 30 shrimp, just $11.99 for a limited time. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. i'm ryon stewart, i'm the ultimate shrimp lover, and i sea food differently. to divvy up this shared data plan...fairly. so, um, whoever's fathered the most children, gets the most data. let's just do it by hair. body hair? most dental work. what? [ phones buzzing and beeping ] stop downloading, and stop liking everything. it should be by who has the least amount of cart
civil society. one that is demanding better government. it did so a year ago regarding corruption and now asking for basic rights for women. in a way, this is india's arab spring. but it needs to sustain itself. and to lead to real reform and change. this indian spring will only work out better than the arab spring if its national leaders recognize the need for radical and thorough change in their country. up next, a look at the fiscal cliff deal in washington from the eyes of two great british economists and journalists. ack ! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in
and corporate america isn't somehow reined in, there will be massive civil disobedience in this country. >> host: all right, john, we got your point. thank you. mr. barlett, response for that caller. >> guest: well, there's a lot there. and you could, you could do a whole book on the federal reserve. actually, bill greider a few years ago did a really fairly decent job on the federal reserve. one thing that i've learned over the years is don't talk about something you haven't spent any time studying. and so i just don't know. is that a fruitful area to look at? absolutely. and especially when you look now, because now it's being driven home to me that you can have massive debt without high interest rates, which is something i didn't think would ever occur. i'm talking about the federal government. because if you went back, you know, back into the greenspan era, the government interest rate, the government was paying 16, 17%. and you kept, you keep looking at the size of this growth, and you say, wow, this is impressive, 2, 3%? i don't know. i don't know what the -- i don't know how that's explai
. [announcer] laura mckenzie's traveler will be right back. momomomomomomore information on, visit me online at... china is home to one of the world's oldest living civilizations. as the local villages and population of china grew, so did the governing empires. royal families ruled for generations, and with each new family came new architecture, religious temples, lavish palaces, and beautiful countryside retreats. each dynasty left its mark on china's history. is it colorful? oh, yeah. is it exotic? [chuckles] you bet. is it historical? well, this bridge dates from the ming dynasty. what do you think? as with any government in power, someone else wanted it. so each chinese empire had a need for protection. to keep the invaders out, the chinese started the practice of wall building over 3,000 years ago, and the construction of one of the world's most famous fortifications began. originally several different walls, it was eventually united as one. the morning mist. isn't that beautiful? and right over there, i can see my first glimpse of the great wall of china. ooh, this is so exciting. the gre
. and then there are civil damages because he would admit to things he said he hasn't done. it's a very complicated situation and a very risky maneuver. >> right. we should point out the attorney that represents lance armstrong has said emphatically there are no discussions of the nature of which we're discussing here. in other words, that lance is going to somehow make a confession. but the thought of this is very enticing to many people, because i think until he says something publicly, that we're all -- there always will be doubters, won't there, don't you think? >> oh, absolutely, martin. i think we've seen other celebrities and athletes alleged to have done wrong things and there are always people who will stand by them. there were people who stood by pete rose for many years, although he ultimately admitted that he did engage in some of the gambling activities that baseball alleged of him. but i think there will always be supporters. but if lance armstrong comes out and says, you know what, i actually was doping, i was doing all of these things, it would be pretty sdas disastrous for his reputation. m
string. so there's a balancing act here as the clock winds down. >> i think that's right. i don't think we're looking at a second and third-string problem at this point. jack lew is by any measure a first-string civil servant. but i think your broader point is correct. you think about the bush administration. you saw hank paulson come in at treasury, bob gates at defense. i think both proved to be important in their roles. that doesn't need you need quite the same changeover. one lien is that the predecessors were considered failures. tim geithner's tenure has been controversial but i think broadly speaking what he did to write the financial system will be considered a tremendous achievement in the annals of economic policy-making. but again, they are in something of a rut, i think, in their economic policy-making at this point, and particularly in their approach to dealing with republicans. a lot of that, i'd say frankly the bulk of that blame falls on the house republicans and john boehner. but it's nevertheless a case that they just put somebody into the treasury department who they
's right. >> you can be sure that legislators and lawmakers in new york and new jersey will be making a stink if that second part doesn't get passed. >>> at least 80 people died in civil war fighting in syria today according to opposition groups. with bloodshed increasing in the suburbs around the capital damascus. the united nations now puts the toll from almost two years of fighting at more than 60,000. meanwhile, u.s. troops have now arrived in turkey to man patriot missile defense batteries near the border. here's the latest from istanbul. >> reporter: reports emerged yesterday, turkish media saying that 27 u.s. military personnel have flown into the southern city and are about to begin sight surveillance where these patriot missile batteries should go. but it was embellished today saying they have begun the process of flying in military personnel equipment into the military base in the south of the country. that will continue in the weeks ahead. dutch, german missile batteries and military personnel also joining them as nato answers turkey's request for extra defense along that v
of the 90 than it is to get 51% out of the 10. and i just, i would short your efforts right now, john. >> well i think it's a real struggle. but i don't think it's one we can give up on. because it's a huge -- i think it's the future of western civilization. these policies we're implementing today don't work. they've been proven to fail in history. countries have fallen over and over again -- >> there have been periods like this before, john? we've never had this many people on the receiving end of government in the united states. >> not in the united states. >> no. >> but i think, i do think that the republicans need a real message that's a more libertarian message. it's hard to know whether obama won over economics or whether he won over social policies. >> that everybody gets to use their own -- >> there's a lot of -- >> i understand. >> simpson bowles, alan simpson and erskine bowles, bipartisan group, they have been trying like mad to get people to pay attention to this message. they're out against today. they're going to have another time-out and the fiscal message, the bipartis
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)